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All the President's Men

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The full account of the Watergate scandal from the two Washington Post reporters who broke the story. This is “the work that brought down a presidency— perhaps the most influential piece of journalism in history” (Time, All-Time 100 Best Nonfiction Books).This is the book that changed America. Published just two months before President Nixon’s resignation, All the Presiden The full account of the Watergate scandal from the two Washington Post reporters who broke the story. This is “the work that brought down a presidency— perhaps the most influential piece


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The full account of the Watergate scandal from the two Washington Post reporters who broke the story. This is “the work that brought down a presidency— perhaps the most influential piece of journalism in history” (Time, All-Time 100 Best Nonfiction Books).This is the book that changed America. Published just two months before President Nixon’s resignation, All the Presiden The full account of the Watergate scandal from the two Washington Post reporters who broke the story. This is “the work that brought down a presidency— perhaps the most influential piece of journalism in history” (Time, All-Time 100 Best Nonfiction Books).This is the book that changed America. Published just two months before President Nixon’s resignation, All the President’s Men revealed the full scope of the Watergate scandal and introduced for the first time the mysterious “Deep Throat.” Beginning with the story of a simple burglary at Democratic headquarters and then continuing through headline after headline, Bernstein and Woodward deliver the stunning revelations and pieces in the Watergate puzzle that brought about Nixon’s shocking downfall. Their explosive reports won a Pulitzer Prize for The Washington Post, toppled the president, and have since inspired generations of reporters.All the President’s Men is a riveting detective story, capturing the exhilarating rush of the biggest presidential scandal in U.S. history as it unfolded in real time. It is, as former New York Times managing editor Gene Roberts has called it, “maybe the single greatest reporting effort of all time.”

19 review for All the President's Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Regina

    If you like detective stories and haven’t seen “All the President’s Men,” that’s something you’re going to want to rectify right now. Seriously, stop what you’re doing and look up which of your streaming services (or libraries!) has it for you to watch this weekend. Or better yet, tonight. Non-murder detective stories may be my favorite genre. I don’t even know what the proper label is, so maybe from now on I’ll call it “NMDS.” You know the kind, where a journalist, concerned citizen or scientis If you like detective stories and haven’t seen “All the President’s Men,” that’s something you’re going to want to rectify right now. Seriously, stop what you’re doing and look up which of your streaming services (or libraries!) has it for you to watch this weekend. Or better yet, tonight. Non-murder detective stories may be my favorite genre. I don’t even know what the proper label is, so maybe from now on I’ll call it “NMDS.” You know the kind, where a journalist, concerned citizen or scientist uncovers a crime and exposes it. Other film examples would be “Erin Brockovich” and “Spotlight.” But “All the President’s Men?” That’s the O.G. right there, and I’ve seen it at least five times.With that out of the way, let’s get to the book. Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward wrote it in 1974 smack dab in the middle of their infamous Watergate reportage that brought down President Nixon and all the crooked white dudes that helped him attain and retain his power. Forty-five years later, there are over 80 editions in print, but I read the original version that ends - quite abruptly - two months before Nixon resigned. With no afterward or additional Authors’ Note, it does feel a bit like reading a story with no climax. That’s an issue with all “current” event-based nonfiction though, right? Each book is a time capsule of a historical moment, but time keeps on ticking even after publication. Woodward and Bernstein of course went on to write a follow up book in 1976, The Final Days, which covered Nixon’s last months in office. That story took them 476 pages to tell, whereas All the President’s Men comes in at a brisk 349. ATPM is an extremely fast-paced glimpse of the two journalists’ detective skills in action. Though a first person account, it is written in third person to make it easier on the reader so there’s no confusion with I/me/he/his pronouns. It’s odd at first, but you get used to it. I’m glad to have finally read the source text of a story I find so fascinating, and now I’m back on the hunt for more NMDS. What should I read or watch next? Blog: https://www.confettibookshelf.com/

  2. 4 out of 5

    Delee

    Re-reading for the 3rd time- I think with what is happening at the moment- it's time. Now there is something to compare what happened then...to what is happening now. Re-reading for the 3rd time- I think with what is happening at the moment- it's time. Now there is something to compare what happened then...to what is happening now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This book was truly unbelievable. The entire time I was reading it, I kept reminding myself that this was real history and it all happened. There was so much drama in all the proceedings, and to realize that it’s the select few (in great positions) of the government beneath it all. I completely admire the reporting of these two individuals and their endless dedication to get the facts and the information correct and to the public, as well as keep their sources anonymous - I was in awe and amazem This book was truly unbelievable. The entire time I was reading it, I kept reminding myself that this was real history and it all happened. There was so much drama in all the proceedings, and to realize that it’s the select few (in great positions) of the government beneath it all. I completely admire the reporting of these two individuals and their endless dedication to get the facts and the information correct and to the public, as well as keep their sources anonymous - I was in awe and amazement throughout every page.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Saunders

    It's impossible to overstate the importance of All the President's Men, considering its impact on journalism and political culture and its not-inconsiderable role in turning the public against Richard Nixon. Woodward and Bernstein's book is structured less as a political saga than a detective story, with two intrepid reporters unraveling the Watergate conspiracy at a time when the press and the Beltway are mostly ignoring it. The book's sometimes criticized for this limited, perhaps self-aggrand It's impossible to overstate the importance of All the President's Men, considering its impact on journalism and political culture and its not-inconsiderable role in turning the public against Richard Nixon. Woodward and Bernstein's book is structured less as a political saga than a detective story, with two intrepid reporters unraveling the Watergate conspiracy at a time when the press and the Beltway are mostly ignoring it. The book's sometimes criticized for this limited, perhaps self-aggrandizing angle, which seems unfair: Woodward and Bernstein would naturally focus on their own effort. They do pay tribute to government investigators who helped them, whether through anonymous tips or their public findings, and (somewhat more grudgingly) to other reporters and newspapers who unraveled the story in parallel. Yet the book's thrill is less in the particulars of Watergate than displaying the nitty-gritty, old school reporting: Woodward and Bernstein, using bluff, guile and instinct, try persuading reluctant or uncooperative informants to speak with them, spend hours playing phone tag with officials and interview subjects, prying nuggets of information from less-than-forthcoming sources (notably Deep Throat, now unmasked as FBI official Mark Felt) and try to win over skeptical, cautious editors (notably the crusty Ben Bradlee) to their cause. It's not, for my money, the definitive chronicle of Watergate - there are more thorough, equally engrossing accounts by, for instance, J. Anthony Lukas and Stanley Kutler available - but it's also not trying to be: it's the tale of two young, scrappy journalists unraveling a monumental conspiracy which strikes at the foundations of democracy. And that's as compelling now as it was 45 years ago.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Furrawn

    Watergate has been in the news recently because of Trump. I realized that I know next to nothing about Watergate. Being woefully ignorant, my husband and I decided to watch the movie. It was wonderful, and I made a beeline to Amazon to order the book afterwards.Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Thank God that they pursued the story, always refusing to give up. Not only did Nixon get outed, this story taught people that if something nefarious and wicked is going on I our government, they can speak Watergate has been in the news recently because of Trump. I realized that I know next to nothing about Watergate. Being woefully ignorant, my husband and I decided to watch the movie. It was wonderful, and I made a beeline to Amazon to order the book afterwards.Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. Thank God that they pursued the story, always refusing to give up. Not only did Nixon get outed, this story taught people that if something nefarious and wicked is going on I our government, they can speak up rather than sitting in silence and fear.I think we probably owe a lot of current leaks during this Trump administration to the fact that Woodward and Bernstein taught the citizens of the United States that they can fight for truth, honesty, and justice.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    The book that opened my eyes to politics...still relevant and (sadly) still not a lesson learned by our politicians.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Trin

    Watergate took time. Watergate took time. Watergate took time. -- Mantra for 2018

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    Actual Rating: 4.5 starsA classic piece of narrative non-fiction and incredible journalism, All the President's Men chronicles Woodward & Berstein's multi-year investigation of the Watergate scandal and related things leading to the eventual impeachment hearings of Richard Nixon. Reading this in 2021 is particularly interesting as one can easily draw parallels with events that occurred during the Trump presidency. This is a bit slow at times, especially towards the first part of the book, and th Actual Rating: 4.5 starsA classic piece of narrative non-fiction and incredible journalism, All the President's Men chronicles Woodward & Berstein's multi-year investigation of the Watergate scandal and related things leading to the eventual impeachment hearings of Richard Nixon. Reading this in 2021 is particularly interesting as one can easily draw parallels with events that occurred during the Trump presidency. This is a bit slow at times, especially towards the first part of the book, and there are a lot of moving pieces to keep track of. However, I found it satisfying and a really important look at the need for good journalism. Well worth a read.Read for a video project: https://youtu.be/HKou8ouOIOc

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Knew the story and still couldn’t put the book down. The movie barely scratches the surface, as does what I’ve learned about it from other sources. Here’s the full story. Exhaustion, fears, doubts, and all. And Woodward and Bernstein are reporters, not storytellers. Real life invents its own story, especially in this case, so that’s not a detriment here. But you can see their hand in this book as soon as they start shaping a story out of the facts and it’s endearing how blunt and unembellished i Knew the story and still couldn’t put the book down. The movie barely scratches the surface, as does what I’ve learned about it from other sources. Here’s the full story. Exhaustion, fears, doubts, and all. And Woodward and Bernstein are reporters, not storytellers. Real life invents its own story, especially in this case, so that’s not a detriment here. But you can see their hand in this book as soon as they start shaping a story out of the facts and it’s endearing how blunt and unembellished it is. Even with that journalistic remove you feel for every single one of these people, maybe even more so because that journalistic remove keeps reminding you, this is real life.I was born into the post-Watergate world. The world these two men helped expose, if not necessarily create. When somebody like Hugh Sloan relates his disillusionment with the people in power— “People in the White House believed they were entitled to do things differently, to suspend the rules, because they were fulfilling a mission; that was the only important thing, the mission.”— what’s hard to believe is that there was a time when that wasn’t accepted fact. What’s surprising is how much innocence we had to lose. Now, the Woodwards and the Bernsteins and the Hugh Sloans are the relic of a bygone era. The good guys. Noble and uncompromising, and I know they still exist somewhere, but as a country I don’t think there’s a return to that idealism. I think we’ve bit the apple for good.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    After recently re-watching the excellent movie version of All the President’s Men, I decided I should finally read the book on which it’s based. It’s been on my bookshelf for decades. When Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward first began to report on the Watergate scandal for the Washington Post, I was in graduate school, and I didn’t focus much on Watergate. I was disgusted by Nixon and had voted for George McGovern in the 1972 election (my first presidential vote), but I had other things on my mind After recently re-watching the excellent movie version of All the President’s Men, I decided I should finally read the book on which it’s based. It’s been on my bookshelf for decades. When Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward first began to report on the Watergate scandal for the Washington Post, I was in graduate school, and I didn’t focus much on Watergate. I was disgusted by Nixon and had voted for George McGovern in the 1972 election (my first presidential vote), but I had other things on my mind. I did follow the news, but not in great detail. I do remember the joy and satisfaction my friends and I felt the night Nixon resigned, which was announced when I was at a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young concert.In any event, this book filled in a lot of the details of the story for me. It is essentially a blow-by-blow account of Bernstein and Woodward’s investigative reporting that began in June 1972 after five men were arrested for breaking into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate complex. The book is a very detailed account, which may be overwhelming for some readers. For those who would prefer to learn the story in less detail, I strongly recommend Alan J. Pakula’s movie version starring Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford. But if you really want to get into the full story, this book does it.I came away from the book with a deep appreciation for the hard work and persistence that Bernstein and Woodward (or “Woodstein,” as their colleagues came to call them) put into their reporting. Ben Bradlee and the other Post editors who oversaw the story also deserve great credit for their courage and determination in the face of White House opposition and competitive media pressure. All in all, it’s a strong endorsement of the necessity of a free press in a democratic society.I also developed a respect for a few people (mostly low-level) in the Administration and the Nixon campaign whose consciences helped them to do the right thing despite realistic fears not only for their jobs but for their safety. Sometimes it only takes a few good men and women to stand up for what’s right.The book concentrates, naturally enough, on Bernstein and Woodward’s Watergate investigation for the Post, so other Nixon Administration scandals, such as the Pentagon Papers case, the resignation of Vice President Spiro Agnew, and the “Saturday Night Massacre,” are not within its scope (although there is some discussion of the Pentagon Papers case). The book wraps up in May 1974, as the House Judiciary Committee begins impeachment proceedings against Nixon. The authors cover the end of the Nixon Administration in their follow-up book, The Final Days, which I have not (yet) read.Although, as I said above, the book is very detailed, I recommend it to anyone interested in American history or the relationship between politics and the press. If you are ever tempted to fall prey to the suggestion that the press is “the enemy of the people,” this book should disabuse you of that notion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    You might ask why I read this book now. After I finished it I asked myself why everyone isn't reading it these days. I had watched the movie, Mark Felt (about the FBI special agent who was known by Bob Woodward only as Deep Throat during the Watergate investigation.) That led me to watch the movie by the same title made from the book All the President's Men. The movie was good but I felt there might be more to know, so I read the book. In 1970 I had my first son followed by another in 1973. We You might ask why I read this book now. After I finished it I asked myself why everyone isn't reading it these days. I had watched the movie, Mark Felt (about the FBI special agent who was known by Bob Woodward only as Deep Throat during the Watergate investigation.) That led me to watch the movie by the same title made from the book All the President's Men. The movie was good but I felt there might be more to know, so I read the book. In 1970 I had my first son followed by another in 1973. We were hippies and we hated Nixon because of our protest against the Vietnam War and because of the Kent State shootings. For some reason, I paid no attention to the Watergate scandal. I blame that on being sleep deprived and living in what my sisters and I call "the baby zone." In fact until I saw Mark Felt I was still hazy on what Watergate was all about.Both movies made me aware that we are in a similar situation now, in my opinion, with an unstable President who attacks the press and is under investigation for illegal activities regarding his election to the office.Though both movies were excellent, the book is indeed better and more informative. It gives the entire blow-by-blow account of Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward's and Carl Bernstein's investigative reporting on Watergate and how that contributed to Nixon's resignation. It is a thrilling though terrible account of criminal behavior and cover ups instigated by President of the United States Richard Nixon and carried out by the men closest to him. It was the #2 non fiction bestseller in 1974.Though Watergate seems almost tame in comparison to today, the story shows the importance of a free press when the American public needs to push back against branches of our federal government, the FBI, and the federal justice system.Exciting, sobering and so timely. I am so glad I read it. It gave me hope and restored the shaky state of my confidence in our democracy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Samanta

    I you don't have an extensive background knowledge of this topic (Nixon's presidency, the 1972 elections, who all the president's men actually are), this book might be just a bit too much for you. I felt assaulted by too much data thrown at me in a too fast pace. There were some very interesting parts, and just like a lot of reviews say, it read like a detective thriller, but by the end of it, the story just dragged, and I lost track of who is who, and what is what and whodunit. On the other han I you don't have an extensive background knowledge of this topic (Nixon's presidency, the 1972 elections, who all the president's men actually are), this book might be just a bit too much for you. I felt assaulted by too much data thrown at me in a too fast pace. There were some very interesting parts, and just like a lot of reviews say, it read like a detective thriller, but by the end of it, the story just dragged, and I lost track of who is who, and what is what and whodunit. On the other hand, it spurred enough interest for me to want to learn more about Nixon and the whole affair.

  13. 5 out of 5

    BAM Endlessly Booked

    2018 Reading Challenge: book set during the decade I was born

  14. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Addison

    Reading this book in 2020 is a really horrifying experience, because everything Nixon and his goon squad were trying to do in the late 60s/early 70s is exactly what the ENTIRE GOP is trying to do now. "At its most virulent, Watergate was a brazen and daring assault, led by Nixon himself, against the heart of American democracy: the Constitution, our system of free elections, the rule of law." In the 1970s, the Republican Party stood up to Nixon when the truth started coming out and said, no, thi Reading this book in 2020 is a really horrifying experience, because everything Nixon and his goon squad were trying to do in the late 60s/early 70s is exactly what the ENTIRE GOP is trying to do now. "At its most virulent, Watergate was a brazen and daring assault, led by Nixon himself, against the heart of American democracy: the Constitution, our system of free elections, the rule of law." In the 1970s, the Republican Party stood up to Nixon when the truth started coming out and said, no, this is unacceptable. In 2020, they collude with Trump. It's like someone looked at Watergate and said, "The only thing wrong here is that you didn't try hard enough." Trump's BEEN CAUGHT, even, and the GOP closed ranks around him, and everything about 2020 is horrifying, but this makes it worse, because the things that looked horrifying in 1974 (coincidentally, the year I was born) look so goddamn TAME now. Ahem.Anyway.This is Woodward and Bernstein's account of how they broke the Watergate story, piece by corrupt and malignant piece. It's well-enough written, even if it's very odd watching them talk about themselves in the third-person, and it is still an exciting story. There is something very satisfying about watching people who think they're above the law being brought to justice, even if Nixon himself slid away under that presidential pardon which he should NOT have gotten. Nobody can be above the law, or the law makes no sense. (There's this big problem in American history---and not exclusively American history, but let's stick with the U.S. for now---where the forces of good actually triumph over evil ... and then fall all over themselves to "put the past behind us" and return to "normal" as quickly as possible, because there are "good people on both sides." And so the forces of evil have taken a staggering blow, but are given the chance to reset and regroup and just keep going. It's what happened in 1865 and it's what happened in 1974, and I am so goddamn tired of seeing forgiveness granted to people who have not earned it and major faultlines in American discourse simply papered over and left alone to ferment in the dark so that they can come back stronger than ever.)Sorry, this is making me very polemical, and I'm mixing my metaphors something fierce.The book is also interesting for its snapshot of how Washington, D.C., journalism was conducted in 1972-4. I'm going to guess it looks pretty different now. (Another thing we can thank Nixon for: the delegitimazation of the news media. Does anyone even talk about "the free press" anymore?) D.C. is very much a boys' club, where everybody on both sides of the press/politician line knows each other and talks to each other and has lunch with each other. (There is one woman in power in this book, the owner of the Washington Post. All the other women are wives and secretaries. People of color are also mostly invisible.) Everybody knows everybody else, and one of the things you can seen Nixon destroying is that understanding that all three sides (Democrats, Republicans, and the press) are doing their jobs and all three sides can be counted on to play by a set of unspoken ethical rules. (Nixon laughs and runs the rules through the shredder.) I'm not a fan of the boys' club approach, but I did like the feeling that everybody involved was being professional, and that being professional involved NOT using every dirty trick you could think of to get ahead. (Which is not to say that politics pre-Nixon was some sort of utopia, just that there was something there for him to destroy---as everyone's sincerely horrified reaction to the truth about Watergate shows.)So mostly this book left me really sad that everything accomplished by the Watergate proceedings just got walked back, and that now the way Nixon was playing the game has become accepted practice for the GOP, and there's no longer any kind of moral consensus across party lines that some things are actually beyond the pale. (Like Trump's entire political career.)There's a pendulum of corruption and reform in American politics. We've been swinging toward corruption for an awfully long time now, and I pray that 2020 is the year we start to swing back.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Donna Davis

    I came of age during the Watergate era, and I read this book before I was out of high school. This was a jumping off point in American history, a time when the way most Americans looked at their government went from trusting (sometimes with limitations) to cynical. It took tremendous courage to follow this story; the pressure to pull away from it was tremendous, both for the Washington Post, and for its two bloodhound reporters who saw a threat or even a probable attempt on their lives, as provo I came of age during the Watergate era, and I read this book before I was out of high school. This was a jumping off point in American history, a time when the way most Americans looked at their government went from trusting (sometimes with limitations) to cynical. It took tremendous courage to follow this story; the pressure to pull away from it was tremendous, both for the Washington Post, and for its two bloodhound reporters who saw a threat or even a probable attempt on their lives, as provocation to dig deeper.These days, novelists tend to disparage reporters, who I grant are sometimes insensitive, particularly toward family members who have been bereaved. But in the era of Watergate, the public would never have known that their own president had assisted in planning and perpetuating a burglary of his election opponent's main headquarters, if this newspaper (if you are young, envision your local newspaper being triple or quadruple the length it is currently, with actual investigative funding) had not blown the whistle. These two men ultimately brought down the president of the United States, a man so paranoid he kept an enemies' list. Nixon himself is an interesting character, but this is not really about him. This is about the hunt, two men seeking the truth, finding it, and putting it into print. A decade earlier, the country had respected and believed Dwight Eisenhower, the president who had been the grand master of war in the European theater. When he left office, the illusion of Camelot prevailed, with the physically lovely and apparently idealistic John F Kennedy in the oval office, and white women fluttering around trying to imitate his wife, Jackie's, hair and clothing. It was Kennedy who accelerated the US involvement in Vietnam, who authorized the bungled Bay of Pigs, but his assassination cut his presidency short soon after it began, and martyrdom kept the mark of failure from touching him.His vice president, Lyndon Johnson, was reviled by hundreds of thousands of street protesters who wanted American troops brought home from Vietnam (and there has not been a draft since). Screaming, "Hey, hey, LBJ, how many kids didja kill today?" They blamed the Democratic president for atrocities created in that Southeast Asian nation, and when the election came around, the Republicans--with Richard Nixon as the "moderate" presidential winner--carried the day.Nixon's administration ended the gold standard, weakening the US economy, but forestalling its actual effect until after he could be re-elected. He won the election against George McGovern and Thomas Eagleton by a landslide, but was clearly concerned that this might not come to pass in the period prior to the election, and this persistent fear of his "enemies" led to the Watergate (Hotel, where they were headquartered) burglary.The story reads like the peeling of an onion. First, the layers furthest from the president are found culpable, but even these eager reporters did not dream that they would lead all the way to the president himself; they begin by finding out who the actual burglars were, and who they worked for. The story as it unfolds, as the layers are revealed, is riveting, and every word of it is true.I am assuming that readers who see this review will not consider the historical fact of Nixon's downfall to be new, and am hoping I have not included spoilers. If I have, my apologies.I don't know that succeeding presidents have been morally better, but they have been much smarter than to keep an enemies' list, and let other people know it. This was a time like no other, and a book worth reading.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jan C

    This was probably the first of many that I read on the Nixon scandal. Actually, I don't know if it was the first.We knew he was a crook ... we just didn't know how much of one.How the mighty fall.I must have read 4-10 books on this subject. I wouldn't touch most of them now. I have put it in the past. And now I won't look at a Nixon movie or book - no matter which point of view it takes. It just gets me riled up all over again. This was probably the first of many that I read on the Nixon scandal. Actually, I don't know if it was the first.We knew he was a crook ... we just didn't know how much of one.How the mighty fall.I must have read 4-10 books on this subject. I wouldn't touch most of them now. I have put it in the past. And now I won't look at a Nixon movie or book - no matter which point of view it takes. It just gets me riled up all over again.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Namera [The Literary Invertebrate]

    Surprisingly gripping book. I appreciate the fact that it didn't devolve into anything personal - in fact, it was so anti-personal I had trouble distinguishing between Woodward and Bernstein until I watched the film. Wonderful overview of the first discoveries of Watergate, but I think the sequel will be better.[Blog] - [Bookstagram] Surprisingly gripping book. I appreciate the fact that it didn't devolve into anything personal - in fact, it was so anti-personal I had trouble distinguishing between Woodward and Bernstein until I watched the film. Wonderful overview of the first discoveries of Watergate, but I think the sequel will be better.[Blog] - [Bookstagram]

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shaun

    Recently read The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump in which Nixon and the Watergate scandal were mentioned frequently and thought maybe it was finally time to read. What struck me the most was how mild the Watergate scandal seems compared to the ethical mess that is the Trump Presidency. From blatant nepotism, to major financial and ethical dilemas, to on the record and repeated lying, to possible collusion, and likely obstruction. I was also struck by the similarities between the way Nixon's admi Recently read The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump in which Nixon and the Watergate scandal were mentioned frequently and thought maybe it was finally time to read. What struck me the most was how mild the Watergate scandal seems compared to the ethical mess that is the Trump Presidency. From blatant nepotism, to major financial and ethical dilemas, to on the record and repeated lying, to possible collusion, and likely obstruction. I was also struck by the similarities between the way Nixon's administration demonized the press, essentially dubbing it "fake news," and how they used alternative facts, indignation, and flat out lies to counter the unraveling story just as the Trump team has done.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ben Kintisch

    If everything Bush does makes you queasy, here's a book remedy for your troubled stomach: Learn all about the skeezy Nixon whitehouse!Great spytastic scenes with DeepThroat, the best named secret source ever. Makes you wonder...did Woodward and Bernsteing love porn? Does deepthroat the pornstar love politics? And what do we think Bill Clinton thinks about all of this? If everything Bush does makes you queasy, here's a book remedy for your troubled stomach: Learn all about the skeezy Nixon whitehouse!Great spytastic scenes with DeepThroat, the best named secret source ever. Makes you wonder...did Woodward and Bernsteing love porn? Does deepthroat the pornstar love politics? And what do we think Bill Clinton thinks about all of this?

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