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Argyles and Arsenic

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In the latest novel in the beloved Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, a murder at a baronial manor leads to a poisonous game of cat and mouse—with the women of Yon Bonnie Books playing to win.After 93 well-lived years, Violet MacAskill is ready to simplify her life. Her eccentric solution? She’ll throw a decanting and decluttering party at her family home—a Scottish Baronia In the latest novel in the beloved Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, a murder at a baronial manor leads to a poisonous game of cat and mouse—with the


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In the latest novel in the beloved Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, a murder at a baronial manor leads to a poisonous game of cat and mouse—with the women of Yon Bonnie Books playing to win.After 93 well-lived years, Violet MacAskill is ready to simplify her life. Her eccentric solution? She’ll throw a decanting and decluttering party at her family home—a Scottish Baronia In the latest novel in the beloved Highland Bookshop Mystery Series, a murder at a baronial manor leads to a poisonous game of cat and mouse—with the women of Yon Bonnie Books playing to win.After 93 well-lived years, Violet MacAskill is ready to simplify her life. Her eccentric solution? She’ll throw a decanting and decluttering party at her family home—a Scottish Baronial manor near the seaside town of Inversgail, Scotland. Violet sets aside everything she wants or needs, then she invites her many friends in to sip sherry and help themselves to whatever they want from all that’s left. Janet Marsh and Christine Robertson, two of the women who own Yon Bonnie Books in Inversgail, enjoy themselves at the party. Not everyone who attends has a good time, though. Wendy Erskine, director of the Inversgail museum, is found dead, and rumors swirl about food poisoning from a local food truck. Then Violet tells Constable Hobbs that a tin of rat poison is missing. And when Hobbs’ own grandmother comes under suspicion for murder, he enlists the women from Yon Bonnie Books, and the race is on to find the murderer. But where do they begin? Are there clues in the “Shocking Stockings” exhibit at the museum? Will the antique scrapbook pasted full of trivia about arsenic and bygone poisoners offer a solution? Or does the answer lie closer to home—is one of Violet’s friends truly toxic? Poisonous games are afoot in Inversgail and the women of Yon Bonnie Books are playing to win. 

13 review for Argyles and Arsenic

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shauna

    This book just didn't have the flair that the others had. The plot felt a bit disconnected and the ending felt rushed and incomplete. The lovely interaction between characters was lacking and there was no growth in any of them. Hopefully, the author turns it around. This book just didn't have the flair that the others had. The plot felt a bit disconnected and the ending felt rushed and incomplete. The lovely interaction between characters was lacking and there was no growth in any of them. Hopefully, the author turns it around.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Interesting mystery

  3. 5 out of 5

    Missi Martin (Stockwell)

    The description on the front inside cover of Argyles and Arsenic by Molly MacRae gives readers a very detailed and accuate description of the story but I will try to give you some more insight of my own findings.Argyles and Arsenic is the fifth book in the Highland Bookshop Mystery series and follows four women and their lives. They have all moved to Inversgail, Scotland and own and run a bookstore and tearoom. These women are Janet and Tallie Marsh, mother and daughter, and they run the booksto The description on the front inside cover of Argyles and Arsenic by Molly MacRae gives readers a very detailed and accuate description of the story but I will try to give you some more insight of my own findings.Argyles and Arsenic is the fifth book in the Highland Bookshop Mystery series and follows four women and their lives. They have all moved to Inversgail, Scotland and own and run a bookstore and tearoom. These women are Janet and Tallie Marsh, mother and daughter, and they run the bookstore while Christine Robertson and Summer Jacob run the tearoom. Christine grew up in Scotland, moved away but returned to take care of her parents. She brought the other three back with her for reasons of their own and have been working together in the business as well as amatuer sleuthing on the side.In Argyles and Arsenic people are invited to a rather curious party. Violet MacAskill is looking to declutter her big mansion, Fairy Flax Hall, and decides to invite people over to take whatever they like that is out in the designated areas. Unfortunately during the party Christine and her mother Helen go into an unauthorized room and find a dead body. When the body is confirmed to be the woman who ran the museum, Wendy, there are a lot of questions as to her death and why she was in a locked room that was off limits to the party goers.Readers will enjoy the storyline and the Scottish words thrown in here and there causing you to stop and look up the word to add to your vocabulary. And the way that MacRae draws the reader in will have you on the edge of your seat. You will feel like you are right there with the fabulous four as they discuss the case and add notes and comments to the documents that they draw up to keep track of the list of suspects. And when their normal police contact is taken off the case, they dig in deeper to try to bring justice to their town. Unfortunately every time they think that they are ahead of the murderer something happens to make them go back to the drawing board and start all over again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Challenges: Get Serious about Series - Option 1 (staying current with series); Reading Goal Posts/Stacking the Series - Priority One/Tier One. A nice series to always come back to. The bantering is high among Janet Marsh, her daughter and two friends, who have collaborated in joint businesses in Scotland. Although the bantering sometimes can be a distraction from the story, it adds to the personalities of the four main characters and to the Scottish dialect. This book stands out in the series as Challenges: Get Serious about Series - Option 1 (staying current with series); Reading Goal Posts/Stacking the Series - Priority One/Tier One. A nice series to always come back to. The bantering is high among Janet Marsh, her daughter and two friends, who have collaborated in joint businesses in Scotland. Although the bantering sometimes can be a distraction from the story, it adds to the personalities of the four main characters and to the Scottish dialect. This book stands out in the series as it includes the historical significance of the argyle pattern, the dyes used, and the consequences of the latter. A museum exhibit, an unusual way to clear a home of one's possessions, a knitting contest, and a man who is trying to make a go to turn his life around mix together in this mystery of misdirection and quirky characters in a bookshop setting.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    #5 in the Highland Bookshop Mystery series. This 2022 series entry by author Molly MacRae suffers from the same wordiness as its predecessors. Nonagenarian Violet MacAskill throws a decluttering party, after identifying everything she wants or needs, she invites friends and acquaintances to come for sherry and to pick over her remaining possessions. Wendy Erskine, the director of the Inversgail Museum is found dead in a closed off room. The bookstore partners look into the murder. Red herrings a #5 in the Highland Bookshop Mystery series. This 2022 series entry by author Molly MacRae suffers from the same wordiness as its predecessors. Nonagenarian Violet MacAskill throws a decluttering party, after identifying everything she wants or needs, she invites friends and acquaintances to come for sherry and to pick over her remaining possessions. Wendy Erskine, the director of the Inversgail Museum is found dead in a closed off room. The bookstore partners look into the murder. Red herrings abound - a missing tin of rat poison, food poisoning from The Potato Chef food truck, and a missing pair of stockings colored with arsenical green dye are among the possible instruments of death. Christine's aged parents and Constable Hobbs grandmother Nana Bethia are possible suspects.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I am sorry to say that this book was just awful. I would strongly suggest that the whole “adding to the documents” concept has run its course and should be permanently retired. It just takes away from the story. Also, the additions to the beginning of each chapter in that almost unreadable font added absolutely nothing to the book. The reader basically has to slog through all of this to get to the mystery. I am hopeful that the next chapter in this story will be much better.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    This was a great book. It took only a few moments to reacquaint myself with the main characters ( I read a lot of books) and remembered I like this bunch quite a lot. The plot is easily followed and the characters (most of them) were fun to read about. The ending was especially enticing. I highly recommend this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Hoffman

    This is the fifth entry in the Highland Bookshop. Janet Marsh, her daughter, Tallie, Summer, and Christine Robertson, are involved in another mystery in Inversgail, Scotland. Janet and Christine are at a decluttering party at the home of a wealthy resident and there is another dead body and mystery to solve.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    I've enjoyed the previous books in this series but was disappointed in this one. The setting and the reoccurring characters got me through the first two-thirds of the book but I scanned the rest because I couldn't make sense of the plot and the epigraphs in italics were unreadable and useless. I've enjoyed the previous books in this series but was disappointed in this one. The setting and the reoccurring characters got me through the first two-thirds of the book but I scanned the rest because I couldn't make sense of the plot and the epigraphs in italics were unreadable and useless.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Wells

    Another great entry from this cozy Scotland base series. The bookshop/tea shop gang must work to clear the name of a friend and keep themselves all safe!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Bowers

    "We're booksellers, not supersleuths."Although owning a bookstore in a small Scottish village sounds idyllic, I think I came to this series too late. "We're booksellers, not supersleuths."Although owning a bookstore in a small Scottish village sounds idyllic, I think I came to this series too late.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I love this series, but had a very difficult time getting into this issue

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Number 5 in the series and it's like returning to your favourite, er, bookshop/café. This time around the Yon Bonnie Books posse get themselves entangled in the poisoning of the local museum director, which obviously gets more complicated the further into the investigation they go...The usual cast of quirky characters make this, as ever, an enjoyable way to pass the afternoon, and |I look forward to the next in the series.(I did have a couple of slight issues:1. the 'handwritten' entries by a my Number 5 in the series and it's like returning to your favourite, er, bookshop/café. This time around the Yon Bonnie Books posse get themselves entangled in the poisoning of the local museum director, which obviously gets more complicated the further into the investigation they go...The usual cast of quirky characters make this, as ever, an enjoyable way to pass the afternoon, and |I look forward to the next in the series.(I did have a couple of slight issues:1. the 'handwritten' entries by a mysterious character who has stolen an antique notebook on arsenic were almost unreadable, so I had to skip them. Note to editors - Sore on the eyes with the font chosen for the ebook - not good.2. at one point a peripheral Scottish character refers to her 'cell' phone. That's a massive no-no. No British person would ever say that, always 'mobile'. I appreciate the author is American and her audience is probably primarily the American market, but that's a mistake which jarred.)

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