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X-Men by Jonathan Hickman, Vol. 3

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One era ends and a new one begins as Jonathan Hickman's acclaimed run enters the Reign of X!In the Earth-shattering X OF SWORDS, the Captain Commander of Krakoa makes a fateful decision that will affect the island-nation's residents! And when the Shi'ar Empire asks the X-Men for help, Cyclops, Storm and Marvel Girl answer the call! Elsewhere, the door to the Vault swings o One era ends and a new one begins as Jonathan Hickman's acclaimed run enters the Reign of X!In the Earth-shattering X OF SWORDS, the Captain


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One era ends and a new one begins as Jonathan Hickman's acclaimed run enters the Reign of X!In the Earth-shattering X OF SWORDS, the Captain Commander of Krakoa makes a fateful decision that will affect the island-nation's residents! And when the Shi'ar Empire asks the X-Men for help, Cyclops, Storm and Marvel Girl answer the call! Elsewhere, the door to the Vault swings o One era ends and a new one begins as Jonathan Hickman's acclaimed run enters the Reign of X!In the Earth-shattering X OF SWORDS, the Captain Commander of Krakoa makes a fateful decision that will affect the island-nation's residents! And when the Shi'ar Empire asks the X-Men for help, Cyclops, Storm and Marvel Girl answer the call! Elsewhere, the door to the Vault swings open at last. But time moves differently in the Vault—and for the beings who emerge, it's been a very, very long time since they entered! And Krakoa's future is at stake when one of mutantkind's greatest threats re-emerges: Nimrod is online! Then, it's time for the Hellfire Gala—and a changing of the guard, as Krakoa's very first team of elected X-Men debuts!COLLECTING: X-MEN (2019) #16-20

22 review for X-Men by Jonathan Hickman, Vol. 3

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    X-Men By Jonathan Hickman Volume 3In a series of seemingly unconnected stories, Jonathan Hickman sets the stage for the next explosive stage of his X-Men run. What will be the aftermath of the Tournament Of Swords? What happens when three X-Men delve into the Vault? And then, to cap it all off, let's have a party - it's the first annual Hellfire Gala!I wish I could pick Jonathan Hickman's brain. He has such a way of telling stories, and the fact that most of X-Men has been single or two-part sto X-Men By Jonathan Hickman Volume 3In a series of seemingly unconnected stories, Jonathan Hickman sets the stage for the next explosive stage of his X-Men run. What will be the aftermath of the Tournament Of Swords? What happens when three X-Men delve into the Vault? And then, to cap it all off, let's have a party - it's the first annual Hellfire Gala!I wish I could pick Jonathan Hickman's brain. He has such a way of telling stories, and the fact that most of X-Men has been single or two-part stories that further the main status quo without having too much in the way of their own connective tissue and yet still manages to be enormously impressive every issue is just...wow. It's a bold move, to have your flagship title pushing things forward and letting the other books deal with the fallout, but it works very, very well.That's not to say the individual stories aren't great - the two part Vault story is a character study for Synch, Wolverine, and Darwin that I never expected to see, while Mystique's growing fury in issue 20 is not going to end well for anyone. And the Hellfire Gala manages to be both a visual spectactle and a complete upset for the X-status quo all at once, and that's even before we delve into the Planet-Size X-Men one-shot.On hand as always for art are a murderer's row of top talent - we have contributions from Brett Booth, Mahmud Asrar, Russell Dauterman, and Phil Noto among others. While Leinil Yu's absence is felt, his covers keep the series together.Jonathan Hickman bids adieu to the flagship X-Men book, but no one could say he put all his toys away before closing the door. It gets thrown around a lot, but to say 'the X-Men will never be the same again after this' is really an understatement.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rylan

    Well Hickman’s main X-Men run is over and sadly it never picked up the way I hoped it would. HOX/POX was one of the best X-Men stories ever it’s such a shame Hickman’s main X-Men book couldn’t keep up. The thing that bums me out is that we are told this is all set up and then Hickman announced he’s leaving the franchise so I doubt we’ll see a lot of the stuff he planned in here except for what Inferno ties up.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Another volume of loose X-stories featuring obscure characters. Hickman writes it, so it feels like rich, dense content when it's not really, and no plot threads are ever resolved. Some parts are better than others: The Shiar issue is a fun aside, if seemingly a one-and-done with out-of-place 90s art. Similarly, the Krakoa/Arrako stuff in the first issue interested me, especially with Phil Noto's art, but was basically all introduction for a future narrative. The two issues about the Children of Another volume of loose X-stories featuring obscure characters. Hickman writes it, so it feels like rich, dense content when it's not really, and no plot threads are ever resolved. Some parts are better than others: The Shiar issue is a fun aside, if seemingly a one-and-done with out-of-place 90s art. Similarly, the Krakoa/Arrako stuff in the first issue interested me, especially with Phil Noto's art, but was basically all introduction for a future narrative. The two issues about the Children of the Vault felt like a deep cut just for the True Fanz! Nonetheless, they had that Hickman shine that made me think I was reading some critical literature. Again again again, though, no resolution. The Children are gonna get the X-Men...later! And Mystique takes on nu Nimrod...(view spoiler)[and fails! So I guess he's comin' down the pike too. Swell! (hide spoiler)]It's exhausting being an X-fan, reading all this X-literature, and then returning to the main X-Men series only to find loose plot threads. I'm a big Hickman fan, I'll read whatever he creates, but the X-verse has been diluted to the point of disinterest. And this main series is apparently designed to be an endless spinning wheel. Case in point: the first issue ends with Scott Summer expressing an interest in creating a new team...a new X-Men team. Sure, we definitely need a rehash of the original gang because the 15 other X-teams aren't cutting it.Rant aside, this volume was fine and I liked it while I was reading it, but I'm ready for something more from my X-adventures.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rick Brose

    The main X-Men series still has the problem of following multiple, separate arcs. However, there is enough meat on the bones of these stories that they now feel more substantive and less chaotic. The story related to the vault is absolutely beautiful in both art and writing. But there is also an issue of utterly awful 90s style art within these pages. It is jarring and takes away some of the magic of the overall volume. The X-books have a lot of bloat across the expanse of releases, but these co The main X-Men series still has the problem of following multiple, separate arcs. However, there is enough meat on the bones of these stories that they now feel more substantive and less chaotic. The story related to the vault is absolutely beautiful in both art and writing. But there is also an issue of utterly awful 90s style art within these pages. It is jarring and takes away some of the magic of the overall volume. The X-books have a lot of bloat across the expanse of releases, but these core stories feel engaging and authentic. It is a great read, but it also makes some of the other releases all the more upsetting.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    So many great story threads. And the art seems to never fail this series.But as with much of this run, the many threads seem to set up so much and don't seem to go anywhere or come to any satisfying conclusion.I understand Hickman and the X writers room are trying to properly set up the X-Men for it's future storytelling once Jonathan leaves the series. But so many things happening that get dropped the next or a couple of issues later to be practically never mentioned again. So many great story threads. And the art seems to never fail this series.But as with much of this run, the many threads seem to set up so much and don't seem to go anywhere or come to any satisfying conclusion.I understand Hickman and the X writers room are trying to properly set up the X-Men for it's future storytelling once Jonathan leaves the series. But so many things happening that get dropped the next or a couple of issues later to be practically never mentioned again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Getting us from the explosive "X of Swords" to the upcoming "Hellfire Gala", this Volume has a few tragic tales and comes off much more dramatic than I thought it would be. Still amazing work by Hickman though.Highlights:- Krakoa and Arakko are having trouble merging, even after everything that was sacrificed in Otherworld. Doug Ramsey tries to help them meet and discuss, but "The Great Ring of Arrakko" (much like Krakoa's Quiet Council) must meet and vote as well.- Jean vacates her seat on the Getting us from the explosive "X of Swords" to the upcoming "Hellfire Gala", this Volume has a few tragic tales and comes off much more dramatic than I thought it would be. Still amazing work by Hickman though.Highlights:- Krakoa and Arakko are having trouble merging, even after everything that was sacrificed in Otherworld. Doug Ramsey tries to help them meet and discuss, but "The Great Ring of Arrakko" (much like Krakoa's Quiet Council) must meet and vote as well.- Jean vacates her seat on the Council to join Scott in the formation of the new team of X-Men, to be announced at the Gala.- Scott and Jean (in their old X-Factor uniforms for some strange reason) as well as Storm, head off to Shiar space to help search and rescue the Imperial Majestrix. Eventually they are joined by Cannonball and Sunspot, who provide some needed comic relief.- Wolverine (Laura), Darwin and Synch head off to "The Vault" to assess the "Children of the Vault" (which is still kind of a confusing story to me). Going through a chaotic adventure of lots of fighting and chronal displacement, the 3 X-Men eventually have to die and resurrect to get away from their insane time together.- Mystique undertakes a mission to infiltrate Orchis and make sure that Nimrod isn't resurrected. Her reward is the resurrection of her wife Destiny. She almost succeeds, but doesn't and Nimrod now stands to gain power and cause the downfall of the mutants. For some reason, Xavier and Magneto don't want Destiny resurrected... has something to do with Moira. I guess we'll see what happens.Overall, an excellent Volume. Full of heartbreak and tragedy, but setting the serious tone for what's coming. Recommend.

  7. 5 out of 5

    andrés

    If there's something Hickman will do, it's write a love story that feels bigger than life. Everything he writes is a big attempt at Epicness, and he succeeds at that in his Laura/Everett and Raven/Irene arcs. Hell, I even felt for the Nazi doctor and her dead husband. Like in the previous issues, Hickman is just planting some seeds for the future stages of his master plan, but the little closure he gives in his final X-Men volume is satisfactory.Could easily be a 5-star if X-Men #17 wasn't A HUG If there's something Hickman will do, it's write a love story that feels bigger than life. Everything he writes is a big attempt at Epicness, and he succeeds at that in his Laura/Everett and Raven/Irene arcs. Hell, I even felt for the Nazi doctor and her dead husband. Like in the previous issues, Hickman is just planting some seeds for the future stages of his master plan, but the little closure he gives in his final X-Men volume is satisfactory.Could easily be a 5-star if X-Men #17 wasn't A HUGE STEAMING PILE OF HORSE SHIT. I will be very relieved if Hickman intended us to see the X-Men as villains in that story, or if Marvel asked him so hard to make government propaganda he outright wrote parody.I haven't read many stories involving the Shi'ar empire so I don't know what has been its history with the X-Men, so I tried to just accept the fact that their friends with the people in its government. Alright. But this story makes the X-Men their clandestine COPS, making them fight (with little mercy or nuance, despite what Storm (a woman who grew up as a thief out of desperation in a post-colonial country, btw) might have said) against an extremist villain that explicitly represents poor people rising against a corrupt government. Later, as an afterthought, our little puppet empress says she'll "help" that impoverished region off-panel with money that Roberto surely got through dubious means. And we're supposed to think everything's changed and the Shi'ar empire is a just ruler that should face no consequences. Living in a country that's currently undergoing one of the biggest uprisings in its history against economic inequality and policial repression, this comic issue felt like I was spit on the face. And not in a good kinky way. Marvel's rising predilection for authoritarian alien empires (see: Empyre) is nothing but shameful. But well, now I know not to expect too much of these books.Mystique, just burn everything down already.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    Stepping forward. In some ways this usca transitional books to msny man of the events going on with the Xmen, but it is slightly more of a step forward then just a transition. I would have given yhus 3.5 stars but I think it edged a round up, definitely not a drop down.The book contains four stories over five issues. The first is the fall out from the X of Swords. This includes Krakoa, Arakko, the Quiet Council, the residents of both islands, and the Xmen.The second story is more of a classic st Stepping forward. In some ways this usca transitional books to msny man of the events going on with the Xmen, but it is slightly more of a step forward then just a transition. I would have given yhus 3.5 stars but I think it edged a round up, definitely not a drop down.The book contains four stories over five issues. The first is the fall out from the X of Swords. This includes Krakoa, Arakko, the Quiet Council, the residents of both islands, and the Xmen.The second story is more of a classic style of the Xmen in action answering a call from the Shi'ar Empire. This story have mu favorite artwork of the whole book. I also enjoyed the vlasdis style action. A reference to the Helfire Gala up coming series.The next two issues are the conclusion to what happened inside the Vault. The reconnaissance them sent in and what they duscover. I like this story and because of the time displacement a lot of ground yo cover the timeline inbetween time periods was a good idea, but eould have prefered more visuals. The final issue contains the birth of one of the Xmen's deadliest enemies in the future. This was the very first mission from issue one volume one. Also a promise made might also be brought to fruition.A good volume heavier readcas the is so much going on and so much to come I the future. The book finishes with a cover gallery of full page spreads of the issue covers snd some varient covers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Hickman's X-Men short stories really seem to come together in this volume, as we finally start touching back on some of his major plots, blending them into a tapestry. "Sworded Out" (#16) is a great coda to the Swords of X crossover, proving the event has repercussions; The Vault stories (#18-19) are a fine continuation of one of our early plots, with Synch's ending in #19 being terrific; and "Lost Love" (#20) is great not just for continuing the Orchis plotline, but also for finally giving us t Hickman's X-Men short stories really seem to come together in this volume, as we finally start touching back on some of his major plots, blending them into a tapestry. "Sworded Out" (#16) is a great coda to the Swords of X crossover, proving the event has repercussions; The Vault stories (#18-19) are a fine continuation of one of our early plots, with Synch's ending in #19 being terrific; and "Lost Love" (#20) is great not just for continuing the Orchis plotline, but also for finally giving us the origin of Nimrod some three and a half decades after he first appeared!(This would have me back rereading the earlier volumes, if not for the fact that there's a Hickman omnibus scheduled for January.)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    Vol. 3 is more of a placeholder than a complete story in the aftermath of X of Swords and leading into the Hellfire Gala. Hickman is planting a lot of seeds that will either be harvested or ignored by future writers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matty Dub

    A volume dedicated to updating the many threads laid down in the first half-dozen issues and HoXPoX made for mostly great reading but it’s bittersweet because we already know that with Hickman leaving the X-line of books, the editors and other creators have no intentions of continuing those plot lines.No more OrchisNo More Children of the VaultMarvel never deserved Hickman’s genius

  12. 4 out of 5

    jacobi

    synch looking at laura the way tom cruise looks at emily blunt at the end of edge of tomorrow…more please

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Picking up after X Of Swords, the spine of the X-books finally gets around to introducing an actual team of X-Men again, something without which the series had been getting along quite nicely as far as I was concerned. Worse, we have to deal with the arrival of a large population of war-forged Arakko mutants on Earth, and I still don't find them terribly interesting, not least because the X-Men comics already have the likewise brutal Breakworld in a very similar niche. Still, their representativ Picking up after X Of Swords, the spine of the X-books finally gets around to introducing an actual team of X-Men again, something without which the series had been getting along quite nicely as far as I was concerned. Worse, we have to deal with the arrival of a large population of war-forged Arakko mutants on Earth, and I still don't find them terribly interesting, not least because the X-Men comics already have the likewise brutal Breakworld in a very similar niche. Still, their representatives do get some good lines this time out:"Humanity? Humans? I must confess... I'm surprised that's...a thing that persists here. Still, thousands of years. Growth, invention survival... these have a way of sharpening a tool. And if you share the world with them, they must be formidable. Worthy of an impasse."To which Magneto, with the weary air of someone obliged to front other people's poor choices, replies "They're just men."Still, behind and beneath all that, this remains the lynchpin book of the era which normally infuriating Bleeding Cool writer Jude Terror, on a rare good day, correctly described as "a trashy soap opera populated by the world's horniest mutants" – something which, I don't see as remotely a criticism. Yes, on one level it's a shame that we won't get to see Hickman's three-act plan for the mutants play out, but at the same time – there have been years of stories about shit things happening to them, their backs against the wall, all that stuff. They're meant to be the future, and especially while our own future still looks so grim, it's just nice to see them having fun for a while longer. Not that all of this could be considered fun as such, particularly not the three poor bastards who spend two issues on recon against the Children of the Vault, or mistreated and manipulated Mystique. But compared to the relentless misery of most X-books since M-Day, even these unluckiest representatives of the new era could be wearing party hats.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam Williams

    This final volume of Hickman's X-Men is really great. Minor spoilers ahead: These stories pick up on threads from the first issues of the run, as well as X of Swords. The Krakoa/Arakko question examined in 16 is super intriguing and guest artist Phil Noto is wonderful. The two-part story of the Vault mission in 18-19 and the Orchis mission in issue 20 are both phenomenal and touching. Big pieces are being moved into place here, and I hope we see them all again soon! Only issue 17 was pretty forg This final volume of Hickman's X-Men is really great. Minor spoilers ahead: These stories pick up on threads from the first issues of the run, as well as X of Swords. The Krakoa/Arakko question examined in 16 is super intriguing and guest artist Phil Noto is wonderful. The two-part story of the Vault mission in 18-19 and the Orchis mission in issue 20 are both phenomenal and touching. Big pieces are being moved into place here, and I hope we see them all again soon! Only issue 17 was pretty forgettable for me; it's just dwarfed by the rest.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Christian Zamora-Dahmen

    Jonathan Hickman’s run started with a bang, there’s no denying that, but it has been losing steam and direction. This title in particular has no core and no spirit of its own. Taken outside of the entire background plot going on, it lacks a voice.The current volume finally gets some meat with the Hellfire Gala, but the rest… it is just a dragging experience.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adan

    Hickman knocking another great collection out of the park. This one features forward movement on a number of plot points, including Arakko, the superhero arm of the X-Men, the Shi’ar, the Vault, the Orchis, and whatever Mystique and a still very dead Destiny have cooked up. Also, Phil Noto did an issue! He’s great!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jase

    Pushing that third star is being nice. The story has been great but the art kills the mood every time, like ED issues. The whole Dawn of X has each issue crossing over somewhere in another series, it's not that fluid. We DO get to the CHILDREN OF THE VAULT as they are always a nice villain treat. We end up in space with the Shiar Empire and Mystique's deal to get back her wife, Irene. Pushing that third star is being nice. The story has been great but the art kills the mood every time, like ED issues. The whole Dawn of X has each issue crossing over somewhere in another series, it's not that fluid. We DO get to the CHILDREN OF THE VAULT as they are always a nice villain treat. We end up in space with the Shiar Empire and Mystique's deal to get back her wife, Irene.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Omni Theus

    FULL REVIEW *Spoiler Free* - https://youtu.be/nXEyekDjJlcSad to See Hickman Move OnOVERALL RATING: 4.5 starsArt: 3 starsProse: 4.25 starsPlot: 4.25 starsPacing: 4.75 starsCharacter Development: 4.5 starsWorld Building: 4.5 starsLow art score for drop off in quality for first two issues in particular and the lack of zeal with all the talking heads. FULL REVIEW *Spoiler Free* - https://youtu.be/nXEyekDjJlcSad to See Hickman Move OnOVERALL RATING: 4.5 starsArt: 3 starsProse: 4.25 starsPlot: 4.25 starsPacing: 4.75 starsCharacter Development: 4.5 starsWorld Building: 4.5 starsLow art score for drop off in quality for first two issues in particular and the lack of zeal with all the talking heads.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Despite its continued veil storytelling, Hickman consistently proves the better writer of the present lineup. He is a step above the best of the others.But where is it all going? Two years in and I still couldn’t say.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rob Marney

    Hickman is back to doing what he does best: putting classic sci-fi tropes into superhero comics with great rapidity. This series of issues doesn't belong in the X-Men main title, having little or nothing to do with the team and basically just setting up for the next event, but they're great issues. Hickman is back to doing what he does best: putting classic sci-fi tropes into superhero comics with great rapidity. This series of issues doesn't belong in the X-Men main title, having little or nothing to do with the team and basically just setting up for the next event, but they're great issues.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    "They are shouting out from every corner of the Earth. No one's hiding anything here. There's no shame. No hidden agendas or manipulation. Just pride." "They are shouting out from every corner of the Earth. No one's hiding anything here. There's no shame. No hidden agendas or manipulation. Just pride."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Armando Wyoming

    3.5 starsBetter than the last volume. The last three issues are the only ones worth reading.

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