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The Journals of May Dodd

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One Thousand White Women is the story of May Dodd and a colorful assembly of pioneer women who, under the auspices of the U.S. government, travel to the western prairies in 1875 to intermarry among the Cheyenne Indians. The covert and controversial "Brides for Indians" program, launched by the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, is intended to help assimilate the Indians i One Thousand White Women is the story of May Dodd and a colorful assembly of pioneer women who, under the auspices of the U.S. government, travel to


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One Thousand White Women is the story of May Dodd and a colorful assembly of pioneer women who, under the auspices of the U.S. government, travel to the western prairies in 1875 to intermarry among the Cheyenne Indians. The covert and controversial "Brides for Indians" program, launched by the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, is intended to help assimilate the Indians i One Thousand White Women is the story of May Dodd and a colorful assembly of pioneer women who, under the auspices of the U.S. government, travel to the western prairies in 1875 to intermarry among the Cheyenne Indians. The covert and controversial "Brides for Indians" program, launched by the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, is intended to help assimilate the Indians into the white man's world. Toward that end May and her friends embark upon the adventure of their lifetime. Jim Fergus has so vividly depicted the American West that it is as if these diaries are a capsule in time.

15 review for The Journals of May Dodd

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Mary Dodd's crime was falling in love with a common man. After being committed to an insane asylum...she was given the opportunity to "escape" by enlisting in the BFI program. [Brides for Indians].... a secret government program. This program NEVER REALLY HAPPENED IN OUR HISTORY.....the idea was tossed around and tossed out. FOR DAMN GOOD REASONS!!!So... the MAJORITY of this book is FICTION. I read 98 pages --then skipped around reading - then jumped ahead and read the last 50 pages which includ Mary Dodd's crime was falling in love with a common man. After being committed to an insane asylum...she was given the opportunity to "escape" by enlisting in the BFI program. [Brides for Indians].... a secret government program. This program NEVER REALLY HAPPENED IN OUR HISTORY.....the idea was tossed around and tossed out. FOR DAMN GOOD REASONS!!!So... the MAJORITY of this book is FICTION. I read 98 pages --then skipped around reading - then jumped ahead and read the last 50 pages which included the Epilogue, and an interview with the author. I've decided to call it quits. I read enough. I was forcing myself too much to invest my time and heart. I had enough when our FICTIONAL Mary turned very red in the face. "Oh Captain, Mary asked in a whisper, "How could I refuse you"? GIFT OFFER: If anyone here on Goodreads -in the United States - wants to read this book - I'm happy to mail you my copy. It's still NEW. It was sent to me by St. Martin's Press....but since I just wasn't really connecting with the writing & storytelling of this book - somebody else might. I'm happy to cover the postage - and send it to another reader who wants to give this book a better chance than I did. Many Thanks to St.Martin. I'm sorry I couldn't get into this book - but I appreciate your sending it to me. Thanks for all that you do to support authors and readers!!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chaybyrd

    First let me say, it seems among GR readers that this book stinks. And I get the criticism, I do. However, I have to say that I found this an enjoyable read. Yes, the voice of Ms. Dodd, our heroine, protagonist, would be feminist (well sort of pseudo feminist) - does sound more 20th Century and less like a believable 19th Century even 'modern' woman but honestly, it kind of made the book more readable to me. I have no interest in hearing a modern writer trying to trifle through old English in a First let me say, it seems among GR readers that this book stinks. And I get the criticism, I do. However, I have to say that I found this an enjoyable read. Yes, the voice of Ms. Dodd, our heroine, protagonist, would be feminist (well sort of pseudo feminist) - does sound more 20th Century and less like a believable 19th Century even 'modern' woman but honestly, it kind of made the book more readable to me. I have no interest in hearing a modern writer trying to trifle through old English in a book written in a journal format. The way it's constructed, this book would have been excruciating if our heroine pondered in her diary speaking like a languid Victorian bore.In addition, since the plot centers around an outlandish concept - One Thousand (19th Century) White Women would 'volunteer' i.e. live such miserable suffering yet comparatively privileged lives - that they would run to live amongst Native Americans - is kind of preposterous. Soooo given that liberty Jim Fergus took, I just decided to sit back and enjoy the ride. And I found it a fun ride. It's a pretty fast read, he tries to make her a strong, independent character and tries to tell a story that demonstrates the complex clashing of cultures. I appreciated the effort and although it's not the best historical fiction I've read, it was one of the most original concepts I have seen tackled.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This is somewhat erroneously in my "read" shelf. I did not finish reading it, so keep that in mind as far as this review goes. I applaud the author's project - historical fiction disguised as history proper (I tend to love things like that), it is a well-researched story told via the faux journals of a 19th-century white woman who went to live among the Cheyenne. My problem with this book is essentially that I did not ever buy the voice in which it is told - this problem has two tiers: First, it This is somewhat erroneously in my "read" shelf. I did not finish reading it, so keep that in mind as far as this review goes. I applaud the author's project - historical fiction disguised as history proper (I tend to love things like that), it is a well-researched story told via the faux journals of a 19th-century white woman who went to live among the Cheyenne. My problem with this book is essentially that I did not ever buy the voice in which it is told - this problem has two tiers: First, it is supposedly a 19th-century journal and the author tries to convey the 19th-century-ness by frequent use of vocabulary like "perforce", however what marks an actual primary source from a specific time period is not merely vocabulary but the nature of observation. That is, you know you're dealing with an historical document, often, not merely by how the author tells the story (what words he/she uses) but what he/she chooses to include in the story in the first place. I simply could never forget that I was reading a 21st-century person's somewhat inexpert attempt at what a 19th-century person would sound like in a personal journal and what they'd choose to include. Associated with this is tier two of my general dislike of this book. I could also not forget that I was not reading a woman's journal, but a man's idea of what a woman would write in her journal. Now, I applaud the author for attempting such a thing. I wish more men would try to crawl into the heads of women. I just don't think this author quite was up to the task. "A" for effort, but I could not make myself finish this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Once upon a time, there was an Cheyenne chief called Little Wolf and a drunken US President named Ulysses S. Grant. After Grant made a horrible fool of himself by being a white guy, Little Wolf was like, "Look, we're matrilineal, so why not just let us have some white ladies to marry and procreate with? We don't even need cool white ladies. You can give us the nice ugly ones. And the pretty crazy ones. But not the crazy ugly ones because that seems like a bit much." And thus the Brides for India Once upon a time, there was an Cheyenne chief called Little Wolf and a drunken US President named Ulysses S. Grant. After Grant made a horrible fool of himself by being a white guy, Little Wolf was like, "Look, we're matrilineal, so why not just let us have some white ladies to marry and procreate with? We don't even need cool white ladies. You can give us the nice ugly ones. And the pretty crazy ones. But not the crazy ugly ones because that seems like a bit much." And thus the Brides for Indians project, or BFI, was born. Except not really. It was apparently proposed, but seeing as the US government was A) not really inclined to marrying its women--not even the crazies and the uglies--off to a nation fighting a losing battle and B) largely made up of bigots who wanted to exterminate the Indians vs. procreating with them, the BFI project didn't exactly pan out. The question Fergus asks is--you know. What if it did? And what if we found the journals of a super sassy lady who happened to marry a Cheyenne chief? Thus, "One Thousand White Women" is born. The Good Look, you gotta admit: this is a pretty sweet premise. To me, at least. I may be biased, though, as the adoption of Caucasians by Indian tribes--particularly Caucasian females--is one of my pet interests at the moment. Same goes for the lives of Indian women. Also, much of "One Thousand White Women" takes place in a stretch of America that I used to call home (ish) so... yes. I'm biased.Long story short--good premise, decent writing. And by decent I mean, "the actual prose quality isn't bad". Doesn't mean it's especially good. The BadAnd that decent prose? It works structurally, but logistically speaking... So much of this book doesn't read like a journal. There's a lot of word-for-word dialogue, which normally I would be able to let go, but--May also seems to insist on giving each "foreign" or "Southern" character an accent That doesn't ring true, especially in cases of Southern Belle Daisy Lovelace--yes, that is her name--and Swiss immigrant Gretchen Fathauer--yes, that is her name.Let me try to think of more things that are less "ugly" and just--"bad". Oh, yeah. That ending. Not to spoil anything, but "One Thousand White Women" has the sort of ending that makes you think the author had a "Dances with Wolves" type of movie in mind. Or something. It was totally unearned, and leaves the reader feeling like Fergus thought he had the next Great American Novel on the horizon.Here's a spoiler alert: he didn't.The UglyOkay. So we have a dude writing the tales of women in a pre-feminist setting.Audience: Ooooh! *winces*The odds are already... not in his favor. Might I add that this is a WHITE dude writing the tales of women AND Indians in a pre-feminist, Manifest Destiny-era setting?Audience: OH SNAP! *eye twitch*Yeah. It turns out about as well as you'd expect.Lemme talk about what I know best first: lady business. Fergus's mid-nineteenth century women, particularly our narrator, are about as real as Pamela Anderson's tits. But while I have nothing against Pamela Anderson's tits and wish them on their merry way, Fergus executes something actively offensive.It feels like he thinks he's writing women well. But these ladies barely fit a twenty-first century setting, let alone a story that takes place right after the end of the Civil War. Fergus is a rape-happy kind of author, which is problematic in itself, particularly when that rape is so repeatedly written by a male. To make matters worse, his ladies barely react. May Dodd is raped repeatedly during her year and a half stint in an asylum; yet she sort of mentions it, goes on her merry way. And that's less than fifty pages into the book.But oh, there's more. I just don't want to spoil it for you. Because I know that if there's one thing I and my fellow ladies love in our fiction, it's some good, old-fashioned sexual assault. Especially the kind that's repeated. Over and over. Luckily, our heroines bounce back with next to no issues. Phew. (The one woman who does act traumatized after being raped is an antagonist and treated as a sort of pathetic wimp.)All that aside, there's just so much that doesn't seem authentic. I can buy that women like May would be willing to marry Indians to get out of a bad situation. I can't buy that May--before the novel's events--was willing, as a fairly aristocratic young woman, to live in sin. She says that she has no inclination towards marriage. She's also agnostic. Um, what? All of this happens with little soul searching. And that would be okay. If she'd been raised in a culture where this was at all acceptable.There's also the problem of sexuality (of the consensual kind). One young lady loses her virginity doggy style--a style she'd never heard of--to a man she didn't know--didn't speak the language of--and acts like this is the best. thing. ever. Again, in the nineteenth century. Also, she's white was raised in the typical white society of the day. Um???Oh, but of course. These ladies were written by men, and are thus somewhat wish-fulfillment-y. Don't ya love that?I feel as if I've written enough about Fergus's inability to write women. What about his inability to write other ethnicities and cultures?Okay, okay. Fellow white people first. Because you'd at least think that Fergus could get his white people somewhat right. Right? Nope.Swiss Gretchen says a lot of "I yam" and "de" and she's basically an ugly milkmaid who talks about her big titties a lot. The Irish twins Meggie and Susie are former prostitutes and general betters and their last name is Kelly and OH. Southern belle Daisy Lovelace--remember that name?--says racial slurs all the time and boozes it up and... Poor man's Blanche DuBois, is that you?But, as usual, the non-white people get the short end of the stick. The token black lady--the novel's title and Little Wolf's specifications of white women notwithstanding--is the daughter of an African princess who runs around naked and "chuckles" a lot. She will be a slave to no man. Never again! So she somehow convinces the Indians, who valued the separate-but-equal system of gender roles greatly, to let her do a man's work. (Never mind that woman's work was not considered slavery by the Indians, but whatever.) As if that wasn't stereotypical enough for you, we're given the Cheyenne. Little Wolf is the strong silent type whose relationship with May gets basically zero development. He's basically a noble savage except for when he drinks whiskey. (The whiskey-swilling main villain of the novel is half-white, half-Indian. Was that supposed to make a point, or does it totally defeat it? I'm not sure. Maybe Fergus isn't, either.) Wow. That's... original.Noble savagery abounds. The Indians don't know how to have non-doggy-style sex or kiss or anything. But wow, they sure do make nice buckskin dresses. And greasepaint. I'm just waiting for them to tell May to paint with all the colors of the wind.And hey! They're letting Helen Flight, the bird-obsessed artist whose name is totally not significant, paint shit! Wow, Indians. You sure are cool.Towards the end of the novel, May manages to pull the wool over their eyes--Little Wolf's in particular--as all the white people nod knowingly. Because remember: Indians are naive creatures. They don't know what's best for themselves. They only know magic. And dancing. And doggy style. White people know the important stuff.This seems like a minor thing to mention, but May, who is totally gorgeous and has the pretty Indian name of Swallow while her friend gets Falling Down Woman or whatever, has this brief fling with a white dude that is supposed to be a passionate romance? But he's a total douche who barely gets any age time and... it's not? I don't know if that had a point either.The VerdictHell. I'm not sure if the book did.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hiroto

    If you read the top reviews, however good the total rating is, you'll see the book has kinda bad reputation, and lemme tell you : it earned it. All of it. What a fuckin sham this book is.I think this is the book I hated the most this year. Actually, more than that, it angered me until I couldn't take it anymore and basically threw it across the room. I want to burn the piece of garbage.The plot promised me strong and independent women, I got a bunch of clichés :-the swiss shehulk with bowling ba If you read the top reviews, however good the total rating is, you'll see the book has kinda bad reputation, and lemme tell you : it earned it. All of it. What a fuckin sham this book is.I think this is the book I hated the most this year. Actually, more than that, it angered me until I couldn't take it anymore and basically threw it across the room. I want to burn the piece of garbage.The plot promised me strong and independent women, I got a bunch of clichés :-the swiss shehulk with bowling balls for tits who's a lil dumb and has an accent so thicc it's written like zat because get it? english isn't her mother language-the ex-slave (how even was she accepted?? we don't f know) who rediscovers her African roots cause she's a motherfucking chasseresse and was accepted as such by the Natives and has always her tities out. because get it? she's black-the sweet naïve one who went because she wanted to be with the protagonist and it was likely her only prospect to get herself married because get it? she's ugly, and she's here to make the MC look goodetc etc, but the worst of the bunch really is May Dodd, our MC and narrator. She's a marysue. She's super pretty. She's got a banging body. She knows Shakepeare by heart. She's the smartest of them all (because she's so cultivated). She's pretty much a speshul snowflake, without the YA magic touch™.She's the ultimate fantasy of the author, and it's so painful to read because it's so clear he thinks she's the perfect woman and want to bang her. She proclaims herself to be "nonconformist", I'm like, OK, in 1875, why not, it must certainly have existed... Except that, for Mr. Fergus, an nonconformist woman only means she thinks about sex a lot, and it doesn't matter if she get raped several times in the process : she's so nonconformist she doesn't know about PTSD. She's so feminist she drags her own sisters of misfortune. Seriously how many times have I read her bash one of them as ugly, or kinda dumb, etc etc ? That's not feminism. That's being bitchy. (also I'm pretty sure she talks like she's in the 1990 at least but- whatever.)She's so fucking perfect for the male gaze IT HURTS. Lemme explain with an exemple : She and her sisters just got to their new home : the Cheyenne Camp. Our Perfect May feels stinky and in need of a bath. She observed the male natives always go together to the river, while the women rest at the camp. So what does she do? She invites herself with the men, looses her dress, and dives directly into the water while they watch with their mouths aghast (because she has a banging body™). Indeed, she is so freakin gracefull the Cheyennes give her the name of "Swallow". I would have called her "Lunatic" but okay. (btw her sisters all got names like "Clumsy One", and she gets freaking "Swallow" wtf.)Also what is up with rape in this book? For two years, our Perfect MC was raped by an intendent in the mental hospital she was shut in (because she lived with a man and had babies with him without being married). That's pretty rough. I mean, I think I'd be destroyed, but heh, that's just me. But once she escape it doesn't appear to bother her that much. She's already in love with her good colonel and they bang fondly, I guess?My point is : you don't INTRODUCE RAPE AS A BACKSTORY IF YOU DON'T SOMEHOW MAKE USE OF IT. IN FICTION, IT'S JUST UNECESSARY VIOLENCE.And later in the book, a new character is introduced and he is a piece of shit, because Mr. Fergus wanted to have a villain guy. The only point of his character is to make rape threats to the girls and particularly to the MC. Every time the character is here, it's just to say "Salope, je vais t'enculer à sec" (wich I don't even want to translate because he says it in french in the book). once again : what.is.the.fucking.point.A few pages later, all the indians of the camp are freakin smashed, because rapethreatsdouche gave them alcohol. They're so fucking drunk they gangrape a poor girl. But it's fine! It's totally OK! Because like 5 pages after, May tells us that Daisy finally loosed the broom in her ass after the "incident"! A lil dick a day keep the bitch away! YOO-FUCKING-WOO.Also, the ex-slave woman was also raped but it’s ok because she was a slave and that’s pretty much expected ; another one I didn’t mention, the youngest of the group, she was mute, and May understands that that was ACTUALLY PTSD because when they’re all kidnapped by another group of Natives, they rape them all and the mute girl actually STRUGGLE so hard she kills her assailant but not before he manages to kill her also.What a fucking trainwreck this chunk of the book is.I should maybe expend on it because once again : I don’t see its point. A rival band of “their cheyennes” (I don’t remember the names help) captures the white women, rapes them, and then is slaughtered by their husbands. Like… I don’t get it ? Why did they rape them when they could’ve flee to their own camp, organize a defense line before the inevitably angry husbands come to the rescue and THEN rape them ? WHAT WAS THE POINT I’M SO FUCKING ANGRYBut do you want to know what actually made me stop reading this piece of shit? The fucking priest, that’s why.Okay so there’s a priest at camp, he’s there to convert the heathens or whatvs. One day, he’s caught sodomizing a child. The cheyennes were never confronted to a crime of this kind, and they don’t quite know how to punish him (we don’t get to know how the child feels btw). He’s finally rejected by the camp at its outskirts, and that’s all. Ok, alright, I can understand that decision. What made me lose my shit was May, our smart and fierce narrator PITIED HIM. Because he wasn’t accepted at the camp anymore. OUR FIERCE NONCONFORMISTE FEMINIST DIDN’T QUITE CARE THAT THE DUDE IS A FUCKING CHILDRAPIST, now, she PITIED HIM.What a bunch of shit. I’m out.PS : if you’re wondering if I at least learned a thing or two about the Natives and their lifestyle, the answer is no. Not a thing

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amy Sheridan

    If I were a member of the Cheyenne tribe featured in this book, my Indian name would be Couldn't-Finish-The-Book. If Jim Fergus were a member of the tribe, his Indian name would be Has-Never-Spoken-To-A-Woman-For-Any-Amount-Of-Time because... really. Oh, and the Indian name of this book would be Fail-Order-Brides.I will start off by saying that I've never been a fan of historical fiction or books written as journals, but the premise of this book piqued my interest. I wasn't even slightly put off If I were a member of the Cheyenne tribe featured in this book, my Indian name would be Couldn't-Finish-The-Book. If Jim Fergus were a member of the tribe, his Indian name would be Has-Never-Spoken-To-A-Woman-For-Any-Amount-Of-Time because... really. Oh, and the Indian name of this book would be Fail-Order-Brides.I will start off by saying that I've never been a fan of historical fiction or books written as journals, but the premise of this book piqued my interest. I wasn't even slightly put off by the idea of a man writing as a woman... until I started reading, clearly the author has never had a conversation with a woman. It also seems like he didn't spend much time researching the social mores of that time. I'm thinking he spent most of his time coming up with stereotypes and trying to see how many times he could use the N word.If I were a betting woman, I would say that Jim Fergus is a comic book and/or fan-fic fan because the narrator, May Dodd, is the biggest Mary Sue EVER, she's the prettiest (I know this not because there was any description of her, but because, from her descriptions, all of the other women were gargoyles) she stands up to authority, mouths off to everyone, all the men love and respect her and she ends up with the only good Indian name. My iPod says I'm 40% in and I tried tried tried, but I really couldn't finish. As interesting as the premise was, there wasn't a single character I didn't dislike.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This is an excellent novel about an 1800's government program to send 1000 white women to marry into the Cheyenne Indian tribe in exchange for 1000 horses. The plan is for the Caucasian-Indian couples to have children, which will theoretically promote peace between Indians and settlers. Most of the women in the program are volunteers from prisons and insane asylums, though the dozen or so females in the story are 'nice girls' who got locked up due to unfortunate circumstances. The novel is compo This is an excellent novel about an 1800's government program to send 1000 white women to marry into the Cheyenne Indian tribe in exchange for 1000 horses. The plan is for the Caucasian-Indian couples to have children, which will theoretically promote peace between Indians and settlers. Most of the women in the program are volunteers from prisons and insane asylums, though the dozen or so females in the story are 'nice girls' who got locked up due to unfortunate circumstances. The novel is composed of journal entries from one of the women, May Dodd, who was committed to an asylum by her wealthy father for choosing a man below her station. The book illustrates the women's lives in Chief Little Wolf's Cheyenne tribe in the Montana Territory, and ends with an army raid on the tribe's encampment. The women have a fascinating adventure and the narrator, May Dodd is a kind of hoot.You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I have to agree with several of the previous reviewers... GREAT premise (exchange of 1,000 white women for peace - an offer actually made, but declined by Grant) and interesting insight into Native American culture. However, I had some of the same gripes as previous reviewers. For one, I thought the writing was very mediocre, it was abound with cliches. If the narrator referred to one more person being "rough around the edges" I was going to scream. Not to mention "he made my skin crawl." And, a I have to agree with several of the previous reviewers... GREAT premise (exchange of 1,000 white women for peace - an offer actually made, but declined by Grant) and interesting insight into Native American culture. However, I had some of the same gripes as previous reviewers. For one, I thought the writing was very mediocre, it was abound with cliches. If the narrator referred to one more person being "rough around the edges" I was going to scream. Not to mention "he made my skin crawl." And, as others said, May Dodd's forthrightness/gumption in the company of men is just not believable for that time period. Even the pluckiest of women wouldn't have been so mouthy and brazen. I just had a really hard time getting into the book because of these things. I also didn't really like the narrator, probably because she was completely unbelievable and sounded very much like a man trying to write as a woman in modern day. I didn't care that much about what happened to her. But I am giving it a 3 for the premise and uniqueness of the story line. Plus I loved the info on the native americans (being part Chickasaw myself!)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews

    Loved the book...it is in journal form and tells of how the government asked the American Indians to trade one thousand white women for horses...their main reason was to "civilize" the Indians and make them aware of and become familiar with the white people's way of life.Very interesting book...topic not as bad as it sounds. Loved the book...it is in journal form and tells of how the government asked the American Indians to trade one thousand white women for horses...their main reason was to "civilize" the Indians and make them aware of and become familiar with the white people's way of life.Very interesting book...topic not as bad as it sounds.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mary Helene

    It's a bodice-ripper! It took me to page 80 to figure that out and then I laughed aloud. Tana recommended it to me, and I usually value her recommendations, but I forgot that this is a genre she finds fun. I was just so disappointed. This book would appeal to those who like the "Outlander" series. There is the heroine who has no faults or failings but who is consistently misunderstood. There are evil characters lurking on the edges, but she feels safe in the arms of a series of fantastic heroes It's a bodice-ripper! It took me to page 80 to figure that out and then I laughed aloud. Tana recommended it to me, and I usually value her recommendations, but I forgot that this is a genre she finds fun. I was just so disappointed. This book would appeal to those who like the "Outlander" series. There is the heroine who has no faults or failings but who is consistently misunderstood. There are evil characters lurking on the edges, but she feels safe in the arms of a series of fantastic heroes who are almost, but not quite, worthy of her. Her rivals and all who have done her wrong are dismissed with sarcasm. I cannot finish it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I fear I'm going to be overly harsh on this book. First, this book took me 3 months to read, which is nearly unheard of, especially for ~300 pages. I kept wanting to just stop reading, but I wanted to finish it so I could say I finished it.The basic story of the book I think is intriguing and could be the basis for a really good book if done correctly. I just think the author missed terribly here. The book is bogged down by dialogue, and crappy dialogue at that. He felt it necessary to write con I fear I'm going to be overly harsh on this book. First, this book took me 3 months to read, which is nearly unheard of, especially for ~300 pages. I kept wanting to just stop reading, but I wanted to finish it so I could say I finished it.The basic story of the book I think is intriguing and could be the basis for a really good book if done correctly. I just think the author missed terribly here. The book is bogged down by dialogue, and crappy dialogue at that. He felt it necessary to write conversation out to sound (in your head while you read it) like the person's accent... very amateur I thought.The main character is just too much. He attempts to give her flaws, but makes her appear too "good" or "important" for a character that is supposed to be flawed. I wouldn't really recommend this book at all...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kkop12

    So I liked the entire book, especially the main character. However, I was a bit bummed by the end. And I even had a little trouble figuring out who the characters were in the final pages (lineage). But what a well written book. I had never read a book about Indians, and while I am sure it only scratched the surface of their customs and way of life, it did present a lot of information about them. In the end though, it was ironic that the main character was unable to identify with either the India So I liked the entire book, especially the main character. However, I was a bit bummed by the end. And I even had a little trouble figuring out who the characters were in the final pages (lineage). But what a well written book. I had never read a book about Indians, and while I am sure it only scratched the surface of their customs and way of life, it did present a lot of information about them. In the end though, it was ironic that the main character was unable to identify with either the Indians (due to their hideous act at the end) or the Whites (due to THEIR hideous act at the end). It left me feeling that she must have been so sad,

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sherril

    That so many on GR did not like One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd is a mystery to me. Perhaps they did not appreciate that it was written in Journal form, which for me is always a plus. Perhaps they didn't know how to appreciate the idiosyncratic descriptions of the women involved. Or perhaps they just don't know a wonderful book when it's right in front of their eyes. ImThe book is intelligent, sensitive and intuitive. In other words, Jim Fergus's book is a gem!I Loved Loved Lo That so many on GR did not like One Thousand White Women: The Journals of May Dodd is a mystery to me. Perhaps they did not appreciate that it was written in Journal form, which for me is always a plus. Perhaps they didn't know how to appreciate the idiosyncratic descriptions of the women involved. Or perhaps they just don't know a wonderful book when it's right in front of their eyes. ImThe book is intelligent, sensitive and intuitive. In other words, Jim Fergus's book is a gem!I Loved Loved Loved this book! It was one of the first books we read in my Bookclub, which started in 2005 and we all loved it. I would go so far as to say, it was one of my all time favorite books. Jim Fergus, the author, has the uncanny ability to write well in a woman's voice. And I say this as a 65 year old long time feminist. He also writes with sensitivity to the great legacy of Native Americans without being sappy and with being thorough. His research for this book was evident. He writes with language that begs to be highlighted, so as to be able to recall it at will. I own the book and am now reviewing the many inserts I put in it to remember passages I loved, and there are many. "Notebook 1-A Train Bound for Glory - "Frankly, from the way I have been treated by the so-called 'civilized' people in my life, I rather look forward to residency among the savages." (from the journals of May Dodd)I do not give five stars lightly, but I give them enthusiastically to One Thousand White Women! It is a book to savor until the very last page.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    “I, personally, have resolved never to display weakness, to be always strong and firm and forthright, to show neither fear nor uncertainty-- no matter how fearful and uncertain I may be inside; I see no other way to survive this ordeal.” I really enjoyed this book. I have been meaning to read it for years. It is a fictional story written in the form of a series of journals about a true event that occurred in 1854, when Chief Little Wolf, of the Cheyenne Tribe met with US President Uly “I, personally, have resolved never to display weakness, to be always strong and firm and forthright, to show neither fear nor uncertainty-- no matter how fearful and uncertain I may be inside; I see no other way to survive this ordeal.” I really enjoyed this book. I have been meaning to read it for years. It is a fictional story written in the form of a series of journals about a true event that occurred in 1854, when Chief Little Wolf, of the Cheyenne Tribe met with US President Ulysses S. Grant to request the trade of 1000 white women for 1000 horses. The trade was rejected at the time. And this book is a kind of "what if" example of what may have occurred as a result. Hence the book's fictional account of the Brides for Indians program sanctioned by the US Government in 1875. Which, of course never actually occurred. Fascinating to contemplate though. Interesting read.Audiobook narration very well done by Laura Hicks and Erik Steele.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lois

    A fascinating look at life among the Cheyenne Indians in 1874 from the perspective of a white woman who is part of a US govt. program to assimilate the natives. The landscape is perfectly described and family and communal life is portrayed in great detail in a supposed journal with accompanying letters and bibliography. It appears to be well researched, but my problem with this kind of historical fiction is always wondering just how much IS true (were the Indians really THAT brutal?) The too-goo A fascinating look at life among the Cheyenne Indians in 1874 from the perspective of a white woman who is part of a US govt. program to assimilate the natives. The landscape is perfectly described and family and communal life is portrayed in great detail in a supposed journal with accompanying letters and bibliography. It appears to be well researched, but my problem with this kind of historical fiction is always wondering just how much IS true (were the Indians really THAT brutal?) The too-good-to-be-true characters were also a distraction.

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